Author: vetcla5

Veterans Disability Aid > Articles posted by vetcla5

Camp Lejeune Contaminated Water

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) proposes to amend its adjudication regulations relating to presumptive service connection to add certain diseases associated with Camp Lejeune contaminated water from August 1, 1953 to December 31, 1987: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/09/09/2016-21455/diseases-associated-with-exposure-to-contaminants-in-the-water-supply-at-camp-lejeune This proposed rule would establish that veterans, former reservists, and former National Guard members, who served at Camp Lejeune for no less than 30 days (consecutive or nonconsecutive) during this period, and who have been diagnosed with any of eight associated diseases, are presumed to have a service-connected disability for purposes of entitlement to VA benefits. Presumptive Diseases Due to Camp Lejeune Contaminated Water Kidney cancer Non...

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Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC) is a tax free monetary benefit paid to eligible survivors of military Servicemembers who died in the line of duty or eligible survivors of Veterans whose death resulted from a service-related injury or disease. Eligibility (Surviving Spouse) To qualify for DIC, a surviving spouse must meet the requirements below. The surviving spouse was: Married to a Servicemember who died on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training, OR Validly married the Veteran before January 1, 1957, OR Married the Veteran within 15 years of discharge from the period of military service in which the disease or injury that...

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Filing a VA Disability Claim

Filing a VA disability claim? Here is what you need to know. [video_player type="youtube" youtube_remove_logo="Y" width="560" height="315" align="center" margin_top="0" margin_bottom="20"]aHR0cHM6Ly95b3V0dS5iZS92bXlRVnhKOE03MA==[/video_player] Service connected disability compensation is a benefit that is exactly what it sounds like: it’s compensation for a current disability that occurred as a result of your active duty service. In order to be successful and have your disability claim approved, you are going to have to satisfy three requirements: Diagnosis of a current disability An event or stressor that occurred during your active duty service A “nexus” or connection between the in service event and the currently diagnosed disability. Diagnosis: you must...

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VA Appeals Process

So, after all the hard work involved with replying to the VA’s requests for more records and for enduring one or more Compensation and Pension, or C&P, exams, you get a notification letter from the VA where they deny your claim or don’t rate your disability high enough. Welcome to the VA appeals process. It can be very frustrating and you may feel like giving up, but don’t take “No” for an answer and know your rights about appealing the decision. [video_player type="youtube" youtube_remove_logo="Y" width="560" height="315" align="center" margin_top="0" margin_bottom="20"]aHR0cHM6Ly95b3V0dS5iZS84UGpvNXhRRGVSaw==[/video_player] The first thing that you will want to do in the VA appeals...

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NOD vs Reconsideration / Reopen

What route should you take with your denied VA disability claim: NOD vs reconsideration / reopen? Make sure that you know the facts before you make a decision. [video_player type="youtube" youtube_remove_logo="Y" width="560" height="315" align="center" margin_top="0" margin_bottom="20"]aHR0cHM6Ly95b3V0dS5iZS9oT1diREpxdXpuMA==[/video_player] First, I want to say upfront that I advise filing an NOD 99% of the time. Let’s start out by talking about the advantages of an appeal instead of a reconsideration or reopen. When you file an NOD, you also want to elect to have a “de novo” review performed by a Decision Review Officer (DRO). A DRO is an experienced supervisor who will take a...

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VA Aid & Attendance

The VA Aid & Attendance Benefit is a non-service connected pension available to wartime veterans and their surviving spouses to help with long-term care expenses including assisted living and in-home care. [video_player type="youtube" youtube_remove_logo="Y" width="560" height="315" align="center" margin_top="0" margin_bottom="20"]aHR0cHM6Ly95b3V0dS5iZS9XMGhYSjl3NjRQMA==[/video_player] Eligibility for VA Aid & Attendance: 1. Military: Veteran had 90 days active of service with one day during a qualified war period: a. World War II: December 7, 1941, through December 31, 1946, inclusive. If the veteran was in service on December 31, 1946, continuous service before July 26, 1947, is considered World War II service. b. Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through January 31, 1955,...

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Agent Orange Disability Claims

Agent Orange Claims: Were You Denied? Veterans who served in Vietnam and "in country" even if only for a day, were exposed to Agent Orange. Brown Water Navy Veterans and Blue Water Navy Veterans who came ashore were also exposed to Agent Orange, as well as many others who served during the Vietnam Era. Presumption of Exposure to Agent Orange If you served "boots on the ground" in Vietnam and you now have an Agent Orange presumptive disease, then you must be awarded service connected disability compensation. Period. Know your rights when it comes to Agent Orange disability claims. Veterans’ Diseases Associated with Agent Orange VA assumes...

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Expediting VA Disability Compensation Claims

VA Wait Times What is the secret to expediting VA disability compensation claims? Anyone who has ever dealt with the VA knows that they do not do anything quickly, and decisions usually take at least a year if not longer. Take a look at how bad the VA’s timing really is (national averages): VA Backlog When the VA brags about reducing the claims backlog, they are only telling half the story. During the period from January 2015 to May 2016, the VA reduced the number of pending claims by 171,000. During that same time period, however, appeals increased by 39,000.  Currently, there are...

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